RSS

Bevin blames voters for loss to McConnell

It wasn’t that he praised bailouts, fudged his online résumé or even that he got caught appearing at a pro-cockfighting rally.

No, according to Louisville businessman Matt Bevin, the blame for his loss in the May 20 Republican primary to U.S. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell belongs squarely with the voters.

bevin_mcconnell

“We have increasingly less courage in our country, and that’s something we suffer from,” Bevin told Politico. “It’s disappointing to me not even as much as a candidate but as an American, how apathetic and timid we have become as a nation.”

Bevin, who is said to be considering a run for governor, told the Washington, D.C. publication that voters backed McConnell over him because of the senator’s ability to “bring home the bacon.”

“There is still the perception, even though deep down everyone knows the federal government is broke, they think, ‘Well, we might get some goodies,’” Bevin said.

Kentucky shows deep drop in uninsured adults under federal health law

Gov. Steve Beshear delivers his 2014 State of the Commonwealth speech on Jan. 7, 2014, in Frankfort. Photo by Mark Cornelison | StaffBy Jack Brammer
jbrammer@herald-leader.com

The percentage of adults without health insurance in Kentucky has dropped to less than 12 percent, the second largest decline among the states since the federal Affordable Care Act took effect in January, a new poll shows.

Kentucky’s uninsured rate dropped from 20.4 percent last year to 11.9 percent halfway through 2014, a decline of 8.5 percentage points, according to a Gallup Poll released this week.

Only Arkansas saw a larger decline.

“From day one, Kentuckians swarmed our exchange, kynect, eager to gain health insurance coverage, some for the very first time in their lives,” Gov. Steve Beshear said in a statement Wednesday touting the new poll. “To see this steep decline in the uninsured rate in such a short period of time reaffirms that kynect is working and we made the right decision for the health and well-being of our citizens.”

President Barack Obama and others have hailed kynect as a national model since it was launched Oct. 1.

At the close of open enrollment on April 15, more than 413,000 Kentuckians had enrolled in health care coverage through kynect. The majority received Medicaid, the government-funded insurance program for the poor and disabled, but more than 82,000 purchased a private insurance plan. Of those, the state said 74 percent qualified for some level of financial assistance to help with their premium costs.

Surveys of kynect enrollees revealed that about 75 percent of applicants who signed up during the initial open enrollment period reported they did not have health insurance prior to signing up for coverage through kynect.

As of July 31, more than 521,000 Kentuckians had enrolled in health care coverage through kynect, Beshear said.

Individuals who qualify for Medicaid may visit kynect to enroll in coverage at any time. Only those individuals who experience a qualifying event, such as the loss of employer-sponsored health insurance coverage, may purchase a private health insurance plan outside of the open enrollment period.

The next open enrollment period begins Nov. 15, for coverage effective Jan. 1.

Gallup’s poll is the first nationwide survey of the uninsured in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Results were based on telephone interviews with a random sample of more than 178,000 adult Americans.

Libertarian plans to join U.S. Senate race

ken4ky_logo

By Jack Brammer
jbrammer@herald-leader.com

FRANKFORT — Harrodsburg police officer David Patterson said he will file Monday to join Kentucky’s U.S. Senate race as a Libertarian.

Patterson, who will turn 43 on Aug. 9, must present at least 5,000 signatures of registered Kentucky voters by Aug. 12 to get on the statewide Nov. 4 U.S. Senate ballot with Republican incumbent Mitch McConnell and Democratic challenger Alison Lundergan Grimes.

Ken Moellman, state chairman of the Libertarian Party, said Tuesday that a signature drive for Patterson has collected more than 9,000 signatures. He said they are reviewing each signature and already have more than 6,000 that are valid.

The Libertarian Party had planned to have a candidate in place by July 31, Moellman said, but decided not to rush the process after being told Patterson would be excluded from speaking at last weekend’s Fancy Farm picnic in Graves County.

Patterson said in a news release that he will be in the race to win and not to take votes from any particular candidate. “A vote for Patterson is for Patterson. Period,” he said.

His campaign website said he is an “aspiring author, political activist and lifelong, multi-generational Kentuckian. He is an outspoken activist for equal rights for minorities and LGBT persons, and for his strong opposition on violence against women and children.”

A native of Louisville, Patterson is a graduate of Eastern Kentucky University. He and his wife, Ashley Nicole Davis Patterson, have two children.

Founded in 1973, the Libertarian Party of Kentucky promotes individual liberty through free markets and social tolerance. Its website claims about 4,500 members. More information about the party can be found at www.LPKY.org.

Latest McConnell ad features Chao appealing to women

McConnellGrimesBy Sam Youngman
syoungman@herald-leader.com

Just days after Democrats scrambled to disavow a political consultant’s comments about the ethnicity of former U.S. Labor Secretary Elaine Chao, she is starring in a new ad on behalf of her husband, U.S. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell.

The television ad, released Tuesday morning, features Chao appealing directly to women, a demographic that Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes has openly coveted since challenging McConnell.

Chao, who was Labor Secretary under former President George W. Bush, asks in the ad: “Have you ever noticed how some liberals feel entitled to speak on behalf of all women?”

“As if every woman agrees with Barack Obama,” Chao says to the camera.

The battle for women — 53 percent of the vote — in this year’s U.S. Senate race has been a nonstop and bruising affair, as Grimes and her campaign have repeatedly leveled accusations of sexism and misogyny at the state’s senior senator.

In an ad Grimes released last week, she focuses on McConnell’s votes not to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act and against equal pay proposals. At the Fancy Farm picnic on Saturday, she put an explanation point on her argument. “If Mitch McConnell were a TV show, he’d be Mad Men,” she said. “Treating women unfairly, stuck in 1968 and ending this season.”

In McConnell’s response ad, Chao calls the attacks “desperate and false.”

“Alison, supporting the Obama administration isn’t pro-women,” Chao says. “It’s anti-Kentucky.”

The ad notes that McConnell co-sponsored the original Violence Against Women Act and says that he has supported even stronger protections for women “than Obama’s agenda will allow.”

The law helps fund investigations and prosecutions of violent crimes against women and requires restitution for those crimes. McConnell and most other Republicans in the Senate voted against reauthorizing the law last year, which expanded protections for gays, undocumented immigrants and Native American women who are abused.

In a statement, Grimes spokeswoman Charly Norton dismissed McConnell’s latest ad as empty rhetoric.

“Simply saying, ‘I’m married to a woman’ doesn’t speak loud enough,” Norton said. “Your actions and record over 30 years in Washington indicate where and how you will stand up for women.”

Chao, who came to the U.S. in the hull of a freighter ship at age 8, is making her television debut in the general election after a Kentucky Democratic operative came under fire for posting on Twitter about Chao’s Asian heritage.

Kathy Groob, the founder of a pro-Grimes Democratic Super PAC who attended a Grimes event in Northern Kentucky with U.S. Sen. Debbie Stabenow in February, said Saturday on Twitter that by bringing Chao into the race, her ethnicity is “fair game” to criticize.

The Kentucky Democratic Party denounced the comments, and Groob deleted them.

Grimes had a 12-point lead among women in a Bluegrass Poll in February, but the Bluegrass Poll released last week showed her lead among women down to one point.

3 evangelical leaders ask McConnell and Grimes to participate in forums

McConnellGrimesBy Jack Brammer
jbrammer@herald-leader.com

FRANKFORT — Three Kentucky evangelical leaders are inviting Kentucky’s U.S. Senate candidates – Republican incumbent Mitch McConnell and Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes — to participate in three forums “to explore matters of concern to evangelical Christians.”

A news release Monday about the forums said McConnell has accepted the invitation and Grimes is reviewing it.

The two candidates appeared together over the weekend at the Fancy Farm political picnic in Graves County and have agreed to appear at a forum hosted by Kentucky Farm Bureau on Aug. 20.

Grimes has also accepted an invitation to debate on Kentucky Educational Television in October. McConnell has not yet said whether he will attend that debate.

McConnell offered a day after the May primary elections to participate in three “Lincoln-Douglas-style” debates with Grimes before Labor Day with no audience. She declined the offer, but challenged McConnell to debate her on KET and in Beattyville and Pikeville during a speech Saturday at the Fancy Farm picnic in far Western Kentucky.

“We’ve had discussions with multiple outlets about debates and some are more advanced than others,” Josh Holmes, an advisor to McConnell, said Sunday.

The issues forums offered Monday will be hosted by R. Albert Mohler Jr., president of The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; Paul Chitwood, executive director of the Kentucky Baptist Convention; and Bob Russell, retired senior pastor of Southeast Christian Church in Louisville.

They will be held Aug. 14 at Eastwood Baptist Church in Bowling Green, Aug. 20 at Highview Baptist Church’s East Campus in Louisville and Aug. 28 at Somerset Christian School in Somerset.

“The purpose of these forums will be to consider the urgent issues now presented to evangelical Christians in American society and in the engagement with our culture,” Mohler said in a news release.

Topics for discussion mentioned by Mohler included “family, marriage, the sanctity of life and religious liberty.”

Russell also mentioned “the freedom to evangelize, racial equality, the persecution of Christians in foreign countries, caring for the poor, justice in the courtroom, defining a just war and the proper treatment of immigrants.”

Each event will begin at 11 a.m. The hosts will moderate an hour of questions and answers with the candidates, who are expected to appear separately. The public is invited to attend the events, which are free.

McConnell is a member of Southeast Christian Church and Grimes is a member of the Cathedral of Christ the King in Lexington.

‘Comment’ will air live Friday night from Fancy Farm

“Comment on Kentucky,” a public affairs show of the Kentucky Educational Television network, will air live Friday night from the grounds of Saturday’s Fancy Farm picnic in Graves County.

The picnic traditionally kicks off fall political campaigns in Kentucky.

The guests for this weekend’s TV show with interim host Bill Bryant of Lexington’s WKYT-TV will be Ronnie Ellis of CNHI News Service, Joe Gerth of The Courier-Journal and Sam Youngman of the Lexington Herald-Leader. The show will air live at 8 p.m. EDT.

The Monday, Aug. 4 edition of Kentucky Tonight at 8 p.m. on KET will be preempted by Fancy Farm 2014, a special highlights program.

–Jack Brammer

Lawmaker takes issue with Stumbo’s comments on Ark park

State Rep. Brian LinderBy Jack Brammer
jbrammer@herald-leader.com

FRANKFORT — State Rep. Brian Linder, R-Dry Ridge, expressed disappointment Thursday over House Speaker Greg Stumbo’s comments this week that the state should not provide tax incentives for a Noah’s Ark theme park in Grant County.

Linder, who represents Grant, Gallatin and Owen counties in the House’s 61st District, said in a news release that Stumbo’s comments “appear to tell those who want to bring economic opportunity to the commonwealth that Kentucky is closed for business, which only serves to further drive other businesses out of our state.”

Stumbo, D-Prestonsburg, said earlier this week that Grant County needs more economic development but that the use of tax incentives for the park is unconstitutional because it violates the U.S. Constitution’s mandate for separation of church and state.

He predicted that the incentives will be challenged in court and the state would lose.

The Kentucky Tourism Development Authority has given its preliminary approval for as much as $18.25 million in tax incentives for the $73 million first phase of the biblical theme park. It is to consider final approval after a feasibility study is conducted.

The park is to open in two years and will feature a wooden ark 510 feet long, 85 feet wide and 55 feet high. It is affiliated with Answers in Genesis, which runs the Creation Museum in Boone County. The museum follows a literal interpretation of the Bible and the belief, contrary to science, that the Earth is only 6,000 years old.

Linder said the proposed Ark Encounter theme park is a tourism-based economic development project that qualifies to receive tax incentives from the state. He said millions of dollars have already been allotted for highway improvements in the area of the proposed theme park’s location

“While Kentucky continues to lose jobs to places like Ohio, Indiana, Tennessee, and Texas, Speaker Stumbo chooses to attack an economic development project in my community by encouraging lawsuits on tax incentives,” Linder said.

Linder said Democratic Gov. Steve Beshear and others are supporting the project “because they understand the huge economic benefits it can bring to the Commonwealth, yet Speaker Stumbo would rather stir up issues instead of considering the opportunities this project will provide to Kentucky families.”

Linder called Stumbo’s comments about the park and religion disingenuous.

“While the Speaker has an issue with a religious theme park receiving tax incentives to provide jobs, he apparently has no problem occupying a chair in the House chambers that has, in large letters, the motto ‘In God We Trust’ behind it,” he said.

Beshear sets up group to help communities hit by natural disasters

HERALD-LEADER FRANKFORT BUREAU

FRANKFORT — Gov. Steve Beshear, by executive order Wednesday, created the Council for Community Recovery and Resiliency or CCRR, a new group that will provide support, leadership and guidance to Kentucky communities drastically impacted by natural disasters.

“Kentuckians have faced an unparalleled number of natural disasters in the past several years – from devastating storms and tornadoes, to dilapidating droughts, to extreme snow, ice and flooding,” Beshear said in a release.

“Through coping with these terrible disasters, Kentucky has developed strong and effective response systems and implemented quality preparedness measures across the state. This new council is another way for Kentucky to stay ahead of the game in natural disaster response.”

The council will be a main resource for communities before, during and after they are affected by disasters – helping them employ the best our state can offer in preparedness, response and recovery, Beshear said.

It also is to serve as an advisory and resource board for Kentucky communities, providing them with technical and financial expertise in preparing and responding to natural disasters.

The group is to be attached to the Department for Local Government and include representatives from several state agencies, including Cabinet for Health and Family Services, Cabinet for Economic Development, Division of Emergency Management, Transportation Cabinet, Kentucky Association of Counties, Kentucky League of Cities, Kentucky County Judge-Executive Association, Kentucky Association of Area Development District Directors and Kentucky Office of Homeland Security.

During Beshear’s administration, Kentucky has had 11 federally declared natural disasters that have caused deaths, injuries and extreme financial loss and destruction to communities across the state.

–Jack Brammer

Stumbo criticizes use of state tax incentives for Noah’s Ark theme park

House Speaker Greg Stumbo, D-PrestonsburgBy Jack Brammer

jbrammer@herald-leader.com

FRANKFORT — House Speaker Greg Stumbo said Wednesday that it’s not appropriate for the state to provide tax incentives for a Noah’s Ark theme park in Grant County.

He said he expects that the practice will be challenged in court and that the state will lose because it violates the U.S. Constitution’s mandate for separation of church and state.

Stumbo’s comments came during a wide-ranging news conference in his Capitol office, during which he also contended that Bill Bissett, president of the Kentucky Coal Association, was “hand-picked” for the job by U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell and that he has decided not to make an expanded gambling bill the highest-priority measure in the 2015 General Assembly, because Churchill Downs has contributed heavily to House Republican candidates.

The Democrat from Prestonsburg predicted that Democrats will pick up at least three to five seats in the state House in November to keep control of the chamber. Democrats now have a 54-46 advantage in the House.

House Minority Leader Jeff Hoover, R-Jamestown, called Stumbo’s news conference “a dog and pony show.”

Republicans seize on Iron Dome comment by Alison Lundergan Grimes

McConnellGrimesBy Sam Youngman
syoungman@herald-leader.com

Republicans took to the Internet Wednesday morning to assail Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes after she said Tuesday that Israel’s missile defense system had helped prevent terrorist attacks from Hamas’ tunnel network.

“Obviously, Israel is one of our strongest allies in the Middle East, and she has the right to defend herself,” Grimes said. “But the loss of life, especially the innocent civilians in Gaza is a tragedy. The Iron Dome has been a big reason why Israel has been able to withstand the terrorists that have tried to tunnel their way in.”

By Wednesday morning, allies of U.S. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and conservative commentators had jumped on the remark as evidence that Grimes lacks policy knowledge.